Language:
Currency:
VAT Mode:
Page:Move Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7  Move Next

Sunrise Chapel





(See options...)

 

Sweet Hour Of Prayer



I've had many comments about this painting over the years from those in the armed services. They have written me from the midst of battle and across the oceans. They have echoed the sentiments in this piece and have experienced similar scenarios while gathered together in faith, before embarking on their assignments.

The inspiration for this painting came from the words to the old hymn “Sweet Hour of Prayer.” It is believed the writer was William W. Walford, a blind priest in England.

Their eyes are closed for a reason. When we close our eyes we begin to rely on our other senses. As we close our eyes in prayer, we trade our physical sight for a spiritual kind of vision. These men represent the best in human nature. The part that says, "I can’t see what the future holds, but I know Who holds it.” Yes, there is beauty in the idea that by closing our eyes, we begin to see and that it was a humble blind minister who brought about greater vision for untold generations.

I’ve come to realize that history books have their story about which side won what battle, but there are times when each man and woman must become a warrior. Whether we win or lose these battles comes down to who we have become because of them. Wars are not always fought overseas and in far-away places, but also in the fleshy tables of our hearts.

(See options...)

 

Take My Hand



TAKE MY HAND

Take my hand and follow me,
There are things ahead for you to see.
Little wonders are all around,
And tender mercies to be found.

We’ll take our time, no need to run,
Breathe deep the air and feel the sun.
The grass is soft beneath our feet,
Sounds are soothing, the air is sweet.

Sometimes we’ll stop and just be still,
Our hearts will tell us God is real!
Small graces along our path appear,
They let us know that Heaven’s near.

So take my hand anew each day,
The walk is lovely and I know the way.

Greg Olsen -2008

(See options...)

 

Temple Spires





(See options...)

 

The Creation Of Adam





(See options...)

 

The Cross





(See options...)

 

The Deacon's Bench



Here's your chance to buy the bronze that was shown in the April 2008 Priesthood Session. There were only 35 made. This is the last one we have.

(See options...)

 

The Enoch Altarpiece Framed



A Stunning New Framed Canvas Masterpiece Set For over a year, artist James C. Christensen painted “under the guise” of an obscure, 15th century Flemish painter, best known for, and named after, a multi-paneled masterpiece called The Enoch Altarpiece. Also known as Jehovah Teaches Enoch the Plan of Salvation, what remains of The Enoch Altarpiece are the two sides that once flanked the (missing) center panel. The two angels, who originally were positioned to bless the center scene, incorporate symbols of God’s original plan for man’s salvation. With the angel on the left are fruit and a serpent, representing the Garden of Eden and the fall of man, while a skull pierced by an Easter Lily appears with the angel on the right, suggesting the triumph of Christ over death and the redemption of man. The fact that the center panel is missing is rich with allegory as well. According to Christensen the missing center panel depicted not only Enoch and Jehovah, but the City of Enoch as well. Enoch was regarded by God to be so imbued with the Holy Spirit that he was “translated” or “taken from the earth” rather than suffer physical death. “No one is certain what happened to the missing center panel of The Enoch Altarpiece, but the hope is,” says Christensen, with a smile, “it will one day return.” The Enoch Altarpiece is a framed, two-piece canvas print set. The artisan who created the frames for the original paintings was commissioned by Greenwich to create two prototypes for this limited edition print set. The elegant resin-molded frames are distressed and hand-brushed with gold to recreate the look of 15th century art treasures.

(See options...)

 

The Falconer Returns



The Falconer Returns is a symbolic painting based on the first stanza of the poem: The Second Coming by poet William Butler Yeats.



The entire painting is replete with symbolism based on some of the events that are prophesied prior to the second coming of Jesus Christ. This is not intended to be a painting of Christ himself, but more of a symbolic representation. At first glance the painting looks somewhat Medieval, however, upon reading the poem and understanding the symbols, it’s meaning becomes evident. Please visit www.TheFalconerReturns.com to explore the symbolism behind the painting. If you wish to purchase a print, please do so from this website as the ecommerce on The Falconer Returns website is not set up to accept orders at this time.



I have also designed a frame which compliments this painting, the frame is also full of symbolism and can be view at: www.TheFalconerReturns.com.

(See options...)

 

The Good Samaritan (Modern)



In the story of the Good Shepherd, Jesus compares a shepherd and a hireling. He explains that a hireling is a person merely hired to watch the sheep. He cares little for the sheep and subsequently the sheep do not recognize his voice. When danger comes, the hireling cares more for his own safety and quickly flees leaving the sheep to fend for themselves. By contrast, the shepherd loves the sheep and knows each one individually. They, in turn, know his voice and follow him when he calls. When danger comes, the shepherd stays to protect the sheep, even laying down his own life if necessary to save them.

This painting was inspired by a story of one Christ-like shepherd whose love and devotion to the sheep saved a young boy. In his own words:

“I became involved in surfing competitions on Sunday mornings and stopped going to my Church meetings. One Sunday morning Brother Marques knocked on my door and asked my mother if he could talk to me. When she told him I was sleeping, he asked permission to wake me. He said to me, ‘Fernando, you are late for church!’ Not listening to my excuses, he took me to church. The next Sunday the same thing happened, so on the third Sunday I decided to leave early to avoid him. As I opened the gate I found him sitting on his car, reading the scriptures. When he saw me he said, ‘Good! You are up early. Today we will go and find another young man!’ After eight Sundays I could not get rid of him, so I decided to sleep at a friend’s house. I was at the beach the next morning when I saw a man dressed in a suit and tie walking towards me. When I saw that it was Brother Marques, I ran into the water. All of a sudden, I felt someone’s hand on my shoulder. It was Brother Marques, in water up to his chest! He took me by the hand and said, ‘You are late! Let’s go.’ When I argued that I didn’t have any clothes to wear, he replied, ‘They are in the car.’ That day as we walked out of the ocean, I was touched by Brother Marques’s sincere love and worry for me. He truly understood the Savior’s words: ‘I will seek that which was lost.’”


(See options...)

 

The Lord's Blessing





(See options...)

 

The Messenger



A Hand-Tinted Original Stone Lithograph Elegant and captivating are two of the measures we set for any James Christensen Hand-Tinted Original Stone Lithograph, and with The Messenger, he’s delivered. Is she an angel or is she human; is she from the past, present or future; she has armor, but is she a warrior; how do the key and the rose assist in unlocking the enigma of The Messenger?

(See options...)

 

The Messenger



Often, there are times in life when we go through difficult periods, times when we feel as though we're wandering in the wilderness-seeking direction, solace, and answers. And often, during those trying times, if we allow ourselves, it is as though we receive a subtle signal in the form of some small wonder. It may be something as simple as turning on the radio and at that very moment, hearing the lyrics of just the right song, or opening the scriptures to a verse with poignant meaning, or even having a little songbird land nearby to cheer us up. These are some of the small things that have helped me along at such times, causing me to look heavenward, smile, and say a quiet, ""Thank You!"" During a time in my life in which I had an important decision to make, I was trying to sort out my thoughts while hiking. As I looked out over the horizon, I noticed that the billowing clouds remembled a figure that seemed to me to point the way that I should choose. And while I know they were only clouds, like an angelic messenger sent to one needing help along the way, they were just as beneficial as all the other small wonders that I've experienced when I needed them most. ""Bless the Lord, O my soul...who maketh the clouds his chariot: who walketh upon the wings of the wind: who maketh his angels spirits..."" (Psalms 104:1, 3-4).

(See options...)

 

The Mission





(See options...)

 

The Prayer



The Prayer by James Seward ~ "The Prayer of the upright is His delight." PROVERBS 15:8

Artist James E. Seward is an ordained minister whose career has led him from illustration of religious books to preaching and back to painting for the Lord. This is one of his favorite pieces, and it touches all who see it.

(See options...)

 

Three Wise Men In A Boat



“These three are obviously on an important mission,” says James Christensen, “dressed in their finest clothes and all very serious, even the camel. We’re not sure who they are but they each appear to be carrying a special gift.”



Their magical golden boat, complete with Moorish-inspired stone arches and a filigreed rudder, sports a “lateen” sail common around the Mediterranean Sea and other Mideast coastal waters. Is this ship floating or has it run aground? Perhaps they are near Bethlehem . . . but it looks a lot like northern Europe. Then again, this journey in a spectacular vessel of imprecise ancestry across a Flemish landscape might just be a jewel of a metaphor for life itself.



“These three wise men are taking a shortcut,” says the artist with a twinkle in his eye.



“There’s only one camel on deck. The other two are below because they get seasick.”



This holiday-inspired image from the professor of the imagination, James C. Christensen, is a treasure for your home year round.

(See options...)

 

Tibetan Prayer





(See options...)

 

Touching The Hem Of God





(See options...)

 

Virtue Words





(See options...)

 

Visitation/Preoccupation



How often do we find ourselves too preoccupied within our own little worlds to realize when something truly momentous is happening outside of them? Are we paying enough attention to those around us to really hear what they are saying? Jim Christensen created this series “Winged Words” to poke fun at people (using barbed wire) and get them to realize, “Yeah, I do that, too.” In this extreme example, a very self-important individual, in all his pomp and finery, fails to realize the heavenly nature of his visitor because he’s just not listening. In Latin, the angel says, “I am dead.” The man’s response to his rather uncommon occurrence, “How do you like my clothes?” underscores how little he is paying attention. The pear in the man’s hand, one bite taken—bordering on the over-ripe, is a reminder that we may not have all the time we think we do to amend these failures in communication.

(See options...)

 
Page:Move Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7  Move Next