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The Art Of Camouflage (Signed)





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The Banker





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The Best Of Days





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The Blackfeet Wall





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The Bonnet Case





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The Buffalo Dance





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The Buffalo Rattler





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The Cache





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The Captain's Horse



The Apache, like most Plains Indian tribes, made horse stealing into a high art. Horses were captured from other tribes and from the white men and their soldiers. The introduction of the horse forever transformed everything about a Native culture that previously lived only on foot; how they hunted, traveled and even competed for honors within their tribes. “A captured cavalry horse that had been ridden by a captain is a bigger prize than one that belonged to an enlisted man,” Howard Terpning says. “The theft or capture of this horse will bring more bragging rights.”



This lone Apache, armed and confident, may be cooling off his horse, or hiding his tracks, as he cuts through the hot, dry territory in the Southwest. “We can only imagine how this Apache warrior was able to obtain this mount,” muses Terpning. “The title, The Captain’s Horse, hints at enough of a story to trigger our imagination and let the viewer draw their own conclusions.”



Howard Terpning Editions featuring the Apache tribe are among the most highly desired by collectors. The Captain’s Horse is also unique in its physical size and price point. At 16" x 13" it fits well in places that a larger Terpning cannot, but is not as diminutive in its impact or size as a miniature. The $345 price point is attractive for a Terpning as well. Set in an edition of only 200, there’s a good chance that someone can steal away your copy of The Captain’s Horse if you don’t contact your Greenwich Workshop Dealer today.

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The Cavvy Quitters





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The Challenge



The Challenge shows the start of a confrontation between a Sioux warrior riding upstream and an enemy in the forest up ahead. He waves his coup stick in defiance at the adversary, who remains unseen by the viewer. The coup stick was important in Indian warfare. A coup was like scoring a point in a deadly game of war; if a warrior could touch the enemy with the coup stick it could be more important than if he killed him. McCarthy said, “In painting this scene, I began to think that it would be both interesting and exciting to see just who this unseen adversary is. So, immediately upon finishing The Challenge I began working on Whirling, He Raced to Meet the Challenge.”

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The Chase





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The Coup





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The Crossing



"Unique in its setting and in the temper of the moment. Towering evergreens and Grand Teton-like snow-capped peaks accentuate a historically cast, untamed wilderness. Here amidst a cold mountain river, a party of northern Plains Indians surge toward the safety of the forest." Rocks and boulders worn by incessant river action; trees felled by lightning and cast aside; and reflective-frigid waters are dramatic features in an unusual McCarthy landscape balanced with energy, motion and pure artistry.

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The Dandy





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The Davilla Brothers-Bronc Riders





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The Deceiver





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The Decoys





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The Dreamer





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The Drift On Skull Creek Pass





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