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Stories Of Winter





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Storm Chasers





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Stray Wolf





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Strength And Honor





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Sugar In The Coffee





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Summer On The Greasy Grass





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Sunday Best





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Sunset For The Comanche



Artist Howard Terpning’s paintings of the American West have depicted some of the most dramatic and moving events in the history of the Plains People. In Sunset for the Comanche, Terpning’s brush recalls the valiant struggle by the Comanche people to retain their land, their freedom and their way of life. “The Comanche people ruled the Southern Plains until the last quarter of the 19th Century,” relates the artist. Their warriors were said to be some of the best horsemen in the world and yet constant warfare and broken treaties drastically reduced their numbers. The Quohadi (the antelope clan) were the last of the people to surrender. To me, this scene represents the symbol of their strength as they clung to their old way of life as a warrior society. The sun is low on the horizon and the cottonwood trees cast long shadows that forebode the demise of their culture.”

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Sunset Rider





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Sure Footed Ponies



Not every horse can be trusted for surefootedness, especially in rugged terrain. This experienced rider is cutting his own trail down the muddy slope and has an inner feeling of gratitude to be on a horse he knows has done this many times before. The pony keeps his head down and looks for the best footing. He is in no hurry and keeps his cool in bad places.

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Surrounded





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Swan Song





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Sweet Smell Of Spring





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Swing Shift



Sundown, and the herd is close by, settling in after a long day on the trail. A cowboy sits on his colt, remaining alert to the cattle´s movement. He´s got a couple of hours on guard, then he can look forward to the refuge of camp, maybe some food, and a bed down beneath a canopy of stars.

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Takin A Soakin





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Taking Stock





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Talking Robe





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Teebow Tipi



So, we really did pick up the phone ask Florida born and raised, onetime University of Florida pitcher Tom Gilleon if there was any connection between Teebow Tipi and the Heisman Trophy winning, University of Florida come Denver Bronco quarterback. Of course, it’s possible that there wasn’t; after all, he did spell Teebow with two ee’s. And, it could be a river near where he lives in Montana; because after all, he did spell Teebow with two ee’s. Or maybe even a town; because after all, he did spell Teebow with two ee’s.

Well, it turns out that he is just a big old University of Florida turned Bronco Tebow fan that chose to spell Teebow with two ee’s. “I paint tipi’s,” says Gilleon. “Spelling Teebow the way I have gives the painting something of an illusion that it is a contemporary western work of art and not a homage to a great quarterback. Actually, if you think about it, when I painted the original, Tim was still in Florida. Now that he is with the Broncos, I could have titled the work Tebow Tipi and it could accurately be defined as a contemporary western work of art.”

And the American flag at adorning the tipi entrance? “Did I just say ‘great quarterback’? I think I meant to say ‘great American quarterback’.”

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Teller Of Tales





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Telling Of The Legends



Since the Plains Indians had no written language, old chiefs and medicine men passed on their wisdom, the traditions of the People and a measure of their own medicine to younger men who would become heirs to tribal authority. These chosen individuals then kept the legends alive and passed them down to the next generation.

Howard Terpning saw this scene in the early morning as dawn broke over the northern Montana. The rising sun was in bright contrast to the dark blue shadows marking the distant mountains and deep canyons. At the time he was atop Chief Mountain with George Kicking Woman, a Medicine Man of the Peigan Nation:

“Influencing every part of their lives, the Blackfeet legends included tales of the tribes’ origin, their religion, heroic deeds of their people and the evil ways of their enemies. I’ve tried to capture the mood of a sacred time,” says Terpning, “where a young man learns of this past and his future responsibilities.”

"Telling of the Legends" is a remarkable 51"w x 31"h Anniversary Edition Museum Edition Canvas. The original work of this work was sold at the Coeur d’Alene Auction in 2013 for over $1.7 million.


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